Uncategorized

Build Your Library: Bullying

School is starting again, either online or in person. While children may have missed seeing their friends and teachers, time at home may have given them a break from bullies. Helping your child navigate social situations and manage interaction with bullies is a challenging and important responsibility for parents and caregivers. These books, from our Build Your Library Collection, can help. Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney, PhD explores the experience of being multiracial, explains microaggression, and provides a resilient response.  Read a post about supporting your biracial child from the Author's Note here. Hear Lulu the One and Only read aloud here. Baxter and Danny Stand Up to Bullying by James M. Foley, DEd follows a pair of friends, Baxter and Danny, as they encounter and learn how to stand up to bullies. Read an excerpt from the Note to Parents and Other Caregivers here. Mind Over Basketball: Coach Yourself to Handle Stress by Jane Weierbach, PhD, and Elizabeth Phillips-Hershey, PhD explores mindfulness as a strategy to handle stress, including bullies. The stressors in Tuck's life are interfering with his effort to make the basketball team. A new mentor teaches Tuck how to manage his anxiety and self-doubt. Read a post about Mind Over Basketball here. Stand Up!: Be an Upstander and Make a Difference by Wendy L. Moss, PhD, ABPP provides strategies to become a "positive bystander" someone who stands up for themselves and others. Two of the ways to be an Upstander include having empathy for others and conflict resolution. Read an excerpt from a chapter of Stand Up! here. Through October 31, 2020, get 25% off your purchase and free shipping when you order books directly from Magination Press through APA.org. Click here to books and use code FF25 at checkout.

Read More
Build Your Library: Bullying 2020-09-01T12:38:40-04:00

Sophie’s Shell

Why is the sky blue? Why are raindrops wet? What are stars made of? Why am I so shy? Sophie can't wait til she's old enough to go to school. She has so many questions she wants to learn the answers to. But when it's finally time, Sophie feels so shy, she keeps popping back in her shell. What can help Sophie build the confidence she needs to come out of her shell and explore the world? Hear author, Jo Rooks, read Sophie's Shell aloud. Sophie's Shell is part of The Once Upon a Garden Series. Read a piece Jo Rooks wrote about supporting your shy child.

Read More
Sophie’s Shell 2020-08-18T13:01:17-04:00

Coping with Grief and Loss: An Interview Remembering Ethan’s Author

Magination Press recently interviewed author Lesléa Newman, about her experience writing Remembering Ethan, a book about how a family copes with grief and loss. Remembering Ethan was illustrated by Tracy Bishop. Children reading the book may realize that they are not the only ones who have ever lost a sibling and there is comfort in that. Magination Press: You are a beloved and award-winning writer who sometimes tackles tough or groundbreaking—even sometimes controversial—topics in your books for children. How do you find your topics?  Lesléa Newman: There is no lack of topics, considering the world in which we live is full of joy and sorrow. I look around and wait for something to tug at my heart. MP: What inspired you to write Remembering Ethan? LN: I was inspired by three things: There was a list, composed  by librarians, of topics that weren’t being covered in picture books. Death of a sibling was one of those topics.  I have a friend whose very young daughter died. She said the hardest thing, among many hard things, was telling her son that his sister wasn’t coming home from the hospital. The character Sarah was inspired by Judy Shepard, who works tirelessly to make sure her son Matthew, who was murdered in 1998, will never be forgotten. MP: What is Remembering Ethan about? LN: The book is about grief and how one family unites to remember and mourn a tremendous loss. MP:  What have reader responses been?  LN:  Tears. Lots and lots of tears. MP:  What was unexpected about the writing process? LN:  I didn’t expect the character of Ethan, who died before the book begins, to come alive as much as he did on the page. MP:  How do you see Remembering Ethan being useful to kids? LN:  I think the book can comfort a child going through the same situation. Children reading the book may realize that they are not the only ones who have ever lost a sibling and there is comfort in that.  MP:  What did the illustrator bring to the story that brought depth or unexpected insights into your story? LN:  The illustrator, Tracy Bishop, did such a beautiful job! I especially appreciate how Sarah is wearing Ethan’s watch throughout the story. That keeps him close to her. I can almost hear the ticking of the watch as similar to the beating of a heart. MP:  Do you have a favorite part of Remembering Ethan or was there a section that was especially challenging to write? LN:  Handling Ethan’s death was particularly difficult. I spent a long time thinking about the way he died, and then decided not to be specific about that. My favorite part of the book is the next to last page when the family is all sitting together, remembering, feeling their sadness, and offering each other comfort. MP:  Was Remembering Ethan your first book to be vetted by a psychologist? If so, what was that process like for you? LN:  I believe it

Read More
Coping with Grief and Loss: An Interview Remembering Ethan’s Author 2020-07-28T14:25:46-04:00