self esteem: 4 Articles

Build Your Library: Cultivating Confidence

It takes a village to raise a child. It also takes a library. Every child is different, and parents and caregivers need resources to navigate developmental changes and individual issues for the children they love. Magination Press is here to help! We’ve developed a Build Your Library Collection with books to help you support your growing child. Every so often people can have a crisis of confidence. Starting school, meeting new teachers and classmates and facing new challenges can be intimidating. These books explore shyness and confidence, providing your child with insights and strategies to cultivate their confidence. Blossom Plays Possum: (Because She's Shy) by Birdy Jones Blossom is a very shy opossum. She's so shy that when someone asks her her name, invites her to play or calls on her in class, she says nothing and hopes no one will see her. Her shyness prevents her from doing things she'd like to do, until her band teacher suggests she look at things in a different way. Gradually, Blossom begins to take chances and builds her confidence. Don't Put Yourself Down in Circus Town: A Story About Self-Confidence by Frank J. Sileo, PhD Ringmaster Rick is worried. The performers in his circus are struggling with their acts and losing their confidence. He gathers them together and points out that they are bullying themselves with negative self-talk and thoughts. Together, they turn their thoughts around by practicing more, asking for help, thinking positive thoughts and bouncing back from mistakes. You Are Your Strong by Danielle Dufayette, PhD  Big feelings can be overwhelming. Worry, fear, sadness and anger can be challenging to manage on your own. This picture books shows children how to find their inner strength with help from family and friends. Mind Over Basketball: Coach Yourself to Handle Stress by Jane Weierbach, PhD, and Elizabeth Phillips-Hershey, PhD Tuck is dealing with a lot. His folks got divorced, he moved to a new town and new school, and though he wants to try out for the basketball team, some kids in the neighborhood won't let him use the court to practice. Enter Walton, who teaches Tuck mindfulness strategies to manage his anxieties and self-doubt. Mind Over Basketball includes a coaching guide with mindfulness skills training exercises targeted at kids ages 8-14. The other titles include a Note to Parents and Caregivers to help you best help your child. Through October 31, 2020, get 25% off your purchase and free shipping when you order books directly from Magination Press through APA.org. Click here to books and use code FF25 at checkout.

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Build Your Library: Cultivating Confidence 2020-08-24T19:09:34-04:00

Ouch! Moments: Strategies to Help Your Child Understand Microaggressions

You may have heard the saying, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” But the fact is, words can hurt. Young people have a wonderful capacity to care about each other. However, they need guidance, mentoring, and modeling to understand the impact of their words and behaviors. ...the fact is, words can hurt. Magination Press book, Ouch! Moments: When Words Are Used in Hurtful Ways by Michael Genhart, PhD, illustrated by Viviana Garofoli, helps to increase awareness in children about what “ouch moments” are, how and where they occur, and what kids can do about them. This excerpt from the book’s Note to Parents and Caregivers, by Kevin L. Nadal, PhD, provides information about microaggressions and strategies for parents to help their children understand them. What Are Microaggressions? Microaggressions, or “ouch moments” are brief exchanges where an indignity, insult, or slight is expressed—whether intentionally or not—from one person to another (especially towards members of minority or oppressed groups). Microaggressions are often subtle. The children expressing them may not even realize that they are being biased or offensive. For example, when a child is left out of a playgroup or friendship circle because they are different, that child may be ridiculed directly, or the exclusion may be more subtle. When the exclusion is more subtle, it can be difficult to prove that it is based on one of the child’s identities (such as race, social class, or ability status). The child excluded can often feel marginalized, isolated, and rejected without understanding why. Certain words or phrases that some people might view as harmless can also be microaggressions. For instance, when children use words like “lame” or “gay” to mean that something is bad, weird, or different, they communicate a message that having a disability or being part of the LGBTQ community is equal to being bad, weird, or different. These children are likely not trying to be hurtful toward these groups, they may just be repeating words they have heard and may not realize the discriminatory connotations. However, for children with disabilities or those who are questioning their sexual orientation, or children with LGBTQ parents, hearing words like these can be quite hurtful and may teach them to internalize negative messages about their identities. Many microaggressions are based on gender. Most girls and boys are taught the importance of conforming to certain gender roles such as boys aren’t supposed to cry or girls are supposed to be demure. Because these gender roles are so pervasive in our society, women and men tend to internalize these norms well into their adult lives.  What Parents and Caregivers Can Do Research on microaggressions between adults shows that these “ouch moments” often result in problems like depression and low self-esteem. Talking about these instances with your child is one way that you can promote your child’s psychological health and wellbeing and help her or him avoid internalizing hurtful messages. When your child is the target of a microaggression

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Ouch! Moments: Strategies to Help Your Child Understand Microaggressions 2020-07-17T19:02:24-04:00

My Wandering Dreaming Mind

Why does my mind fly to the sky, and think of fairies and mermaids and frogs? Sadie feels like her thoughts are soaring into the clouds and she can't bring them back down to earth. She has trouble paying attention, which makes keeping track of schoolwork, friends, chores, and everything else really tough. Sometimes she can only focus on her mistakes. Hear author Merriam Sarcia Saunders, LMFT, read My Wandering Dreaming Mind aloud and find out how Sadie's parents help her see how amazing she is. Click here to read an excerpt from the Note to Parents and Caregivers that provides strategies to help your child focus on the positive aspects of their dreaming, creative mind and to keep trying when things don't go their way.

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My Wandering Dreaming Mind 2020-05-28T15:55:43-04:00