positive self-talk: 2 Articles

Build Your Library: Cultivating Confidence

It takes a village to raise a child. It also takes a library. Every child is different, and parents and caregivers need resources to navigate developmental changes and individual issues for the children they love. Magination Press is here to help! We’ve developed a Build Your Library Collection with books to help you support your growing child. Every so often people can have a crisis of confidence. Starting school, meeting new teachers and classmates and facing new challenges can be intimidating. These books explore shyness and confidence, providing your child with insights and strategies to cultivate their confidence. Blossom Plays Possum: (Because She's Shy) by Birdy Jones Blossom is a very shy opossum. She's so shy that when someone asks her her name, invites her to play or calls on her in class, she says nothing and hopes no one will see her. Her shyness prevents her from doing things she'd like to do, until her band teacher suggests she look at things in a different way. Gradually, Blossom begins to take chances and builds her confidence. Don't Put Yourself Down in Circus Town: A Story About Self-Confidence by Frank J. Sileo, PhD Ringmaster Rick is worried. The performers in his circus are struggling with their acts and losing their confidence. He gathers them together and points out that they are bullying themselves with negative self-talk and thoughts. Together, they turn their thoughts around by practicing more, asking for help, thinking positive thoughts and bouncing back from mistakes. You Are Your Strong by Danielle Dufayette, PhD  Big feelings can be overwhelming. Worry, fear, sadness and anger can be challenging to manage on your own. This picture books shows children how to find their inner strength with help from family and friends. Mind Over Basketball: Coach Yourself to Handle Stress by Jane Weierbach, PhD, and Elizabeth Phillips-Hershey, PhD Tuck is dealing with a lot. His folks got divorced, he moved to a new town and new school, and though he wants to try out for the basketball team, some kids in the neighborhood won't let him use the court to practice. Enter Walton, who teaches Tuck mindfulness strategies to manage his anxieties and self-doubt. Mind Over Basketball includes a coaching guide with mindfulness skills training exercises targeted at kids ages 8-14. The other titles include a Note to Parents and Caregivers to help you best help your child. Through October 31, 2020, get 25% off your purchase and free shipping when you order books directly from Magination Press through APA.org. Click here to books and use code FF25 at checkout.

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Build Your Library: Cultivating Confidence 2020-08-24T19:09:34-04:00

Kids Feeling Stressed? Help Them Learn Self-Care Skills!

We’re all feeling some big emotions right now, as the whole world battles the COVID-19 virus. Adults and children alike are feeling uncertain, anxious, lonely and scared. This is the time to practice self-care skills. Here are some tips to help your child develop self-care skills to recognize and manage their emotions: As parents and caregivers, we can help kids develop strong self-care skills to help them weather adversity and cheer themselves on. Magination Press’s Fantastic You by Danielle Dufayet shows young readers how to develop a positive and nurturing relationship with themselves. In the note to parents and caregivers, Dr. Julia Martin Burch offers strategies to help children build self-care skills that mirror what the kids in Fantastic You do. Identifying Emotions Learning to notice, identify, and soothe their own emotions begins in childhood, but your child will continue to develop these skills throughout their lives. Emotions can be overwhelming to all of us. Young children in particular can struggle to understand surges in emotion and physical sensations that go with them, like butterflies in their tummies or feeling shaky. They rely on you to help them figure out what the feelings mean and to name them. Get curious with your child about what they are feeling. You can ask them what is happening inside their body and if they can name the emotion they are feeling. You can also support them by describing what you see and guessing what the emotion might be that they are feeling. “I see that your face is red and your hands are in fists. When I do those actions, I’m often feeling angry. Do you think that’s how you are feeling?” Self-validation Along with learning to recognize and identify emotions, it’s important for children to learn that emotions aren’t right or wrong, they just are. No matter how big or painful an emotion is, it is a safe and acceptable experience. You can help children by noticing and validating their emotions. For example, you could say, “It's hard that we all have to stay home to beat the virus. That means you can't see your friends. I can see why you are feeling sad.” When children learn to validate their own feelings, it allows them to reduce the intensity of an emotion they are feeling in the moment and builds confidence in their ability to manage their emotions. Self-soothing Help your child discover which activities or experiences help them calm down or feel better. What helps a child feel better will depend on the situation and on the child’s preferences, so explore a lot of different activities. Some kids will find that soothing their senses with music, a hot bath, looking at clouds, or snuggling with a favorite lovey might help. Others might find a project like building a fort or putting on a puppet show is a good distraction. Finding out what helps you self-soothe is an important skill that’s fun to develop. Help your child collect some of their

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Kids Feeling Stressed? Help Them Learn Self-Care Skills! 2020-05-13T18:14:29-04:00