feelings: 4 Articles

Home for A While

Calvin has lived in many houses, but he still hasn't found a home. The foster care experience can bounce kids from home to home, causing  feelings of abandonment and uncertainty. Sometimes a grown-up can help a child learn to manage those feelings and identify their strengths. In Home for A While, Maggie is that grown up for Calvin. She shows him respect, offers him kindness, and helps him see things in himself that he's never noticed before. Hear author Lauren Kerstein read Home for A While aloud and practice some strategies to manage big feelings.

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Home for A While 2020-11-24T12:11:57-05:00

The Gift of Gerbert’s Feathers

Serious illness in a family can cause many emotions like worry, fear, or sadness. Whether a child is experiencing the illness or a loved one is ill, children need the opportunity to talk about their feelings. The Gift of Gerbert's Feathers explores how a family supports young Gerbert, as he experiences a serious illness, and how Gerbert finds a way for his family to remember him when he's gone. Hear the authors read The Gift of Gerbert's Feathers aloud and see three activities related to feathers. Read two posts from the authors about helping siblings cope with grief and helping children with serious illness talk about their feelings. Read the Note to Parents and Caregivers from The Gift of Gerbert's Feathers, the Kids' Reading Guide, and access a feather coloring sheet.

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The Gift of Gerbert’s Feathers 2020-09-10T19:33:30-04:00

COVID-19 Self-Care: Get Moving

This summer, many kids and families find themselves without much anticipated camps, trips to the pool, or vacations. Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, children are missing their friends, mourning the loss summer adventures, and worrying about what form school will take in the fall.  While splashing at the pool or playing on a sports team might not be possible this summer, finding other ways to get moving can help improve your child’s mood. Physical activity, whether it’s dancing, walking the dog, gardening, or riding a bike, can provide some relief from anxiety and COVID-19 summertime blues. Magination Press offers books for young children and teens that encourage physical movement or exercise. Bee Calm: The Buzz on Yoga by Frank J. Sileo, PhD, illustrated by Claire Keay, introduces kids to beginning yoga poses such as Mountain, Chair, Airplane, Cobra, and more. A note to parents and caregivers provides suggestions for introducing children to yoga and instructions for the poses in the story. Ready to start feeling better? Move and groove your way into a better mood! Move Your Mood!  by Brenda S. Miles, PhD, and Colleen A. Patterson, MA, illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown, invites kids to explore their emotions through movement and introduces the idea that moving our bodies affects the way we feel inside. A note to parents, caregivers, and teachers provides suggestions for how to use the book with your child, and additional ideas for teaching your child about emotions. These books for teens provide more comprehensive guides toward self-care: Depression: A Teen's Guide to Survive and Thrive by Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD, and Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, draws on Cognitive Behavior Therapy to help teens understand depression, and provides practical information on actions they can take to start feeling better. How to Feel Good: 20 Things Teens Can Do by Tricia Mangan, MA, offers strategies for teens to use to slow down and and pay attention to how they feel and what they think about themselves. Suggestions of "ways to be kind to your whole self" explore how caring for your physical body can improve your mood. Getting moving is a great way for kids and families to spend time together and feel better. If your child seems especially anxious or you are concerned about depression, please seek professional help. APA can help you find a psychologist near you, and during the pandemic, socially distant appointments are available.

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COVID-19 Self-Care: Get Moving 2020-11-16T21:54:17-05:00