bullying: 3 Articles

Books for No Name-Calling Week

GLSEN’s No Name-Calling Week, January 17-21, is a week organized by K-12 educators and students to end name-calling and bullying in schools. This week aims to disrupt anti-LGBTQ+ harassment and bias-based bullying, and invites LGBTQ+ students to assert what they want to be called. Magination Press has several books addressing bullying, name-calling, and LBGTQ+ inclusion in observance of No Name-Calling Week. They’re So Flamboyant by Michael Genhart This fun and funny bird’s-eye tome to individuality, community, and harmony follows the reactions of a neighborhood full of birds when a “flamboyance” of flamingos moves in.  “Feathered friends are flustered when flamingos move into the neighborhood… This story is a welcome springboard for age-appropriate discussions of assumptions, stereotypes, and inclusion. Engaging wordplay makes a serious point about inclusion.”  —Kirkus Reviews   Hear They’re So Flamboyant read aloud. Read an excerpt from the Author’s Note.   Jacob’s School Play: Starring He, She and They by Sarah and Ian Hoffman Jacob—star of one of the most banned books of the decade according to the American Library Association—is back in his third book and ready to put on a school play! While learning their lines and making their costumes, Jacob’s class finds itself unexpectedly struggling with identity, and what it means to be “he”, “she”, or “they”. Jacob’s School Play is an engaging way to introduce young readers to non-binary people and the pronoun options available to us all. Learning that individuals are more nuanced than how others see them is a developmentally important milestone and helps foster respect of one’s self and one’s peers. “This straightforward and important book that honors everyone will help adults have thoughtful conversations with young children about gender identity, particularly the message about respecting someone's choice to use ungendered pronouns…”  —Booklist Hear Jacob’s School Play read aloud. Read an interview with Jacob about understanding pronouns.     Papa, Daddy, & Riley by Seamus Kirst Riley is Papa’s princess and Daddy’s dragon. She loves her two fathers! When Riley’s classmate asks her which dad is her real one, Riley is confused. She doesn’t want to have to pick one or the other. Families are made of love in this heartwarming story that shows there are lots of ways to be part of one. “A little girl with two dads confronts homophobia…. Sweet if not groundbreaking….”  —Kirkus Reviews Hear Papa, Daddy, & Riley read aloud. Read a post by Seamus Kirst about the power of inclusion.   Ouch Moments: When Words Are Used in Hurtful Ways by Michael Genhart, PhD Hearing a mean or hurtful word hurts a lot. When other kids say something mean or hurtful, it is hard to know what to do. Ouch Moments: When Words Are Used in Hurtful Ways explains these "ouch moments" in kid-friendly terms, offers practical strategies for what kids can do to help, and empowers kids to stand up to mean and hurtful language. A Note to Parents and Caregivers by Kevin L. Nadal, PhD, provides more information about microaggressions, and strategies for

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Books for No Name-Calling Week 2022-01-14T12:24:17-05:00

Books to Tackle Bullying

October is Bullying Prevention Month. Magination Press has published several books about the experience of bullying and how to respond to it, as well as resources for being a leader, good citizen, and for being resilient.  Books about bullying Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney, PhD explores the experience of being multiracial, explains microaggression, and provides a resilient response.  Read a post about supporting your biracial child from the Author’s Note here. Hear Lulu the One and Only read aloud here. Baxter and Danny Stand Up to Bullying by James M. Foley, DEd follows a pair of friends, Baxter and Danny, as they encounter and learn how to stand up to bullies. Read an excerpt from the Note to Parents and Other Caregivers here. Books About Helping Make Your World a Better Place  The Hero Handbook by Mark Langdon shows kids how to be the hero of their own story and discover their own hero journey. Heroes take chances, do hard things, and sometimes even change the world. To become a hero, kids can surround themselves with supportive people, boost their self-esteem and self-awareness, find their passion, and have the courage to make things happen. Read an excerpt from The Hero Handbook here. Stand Up!: Be an Upstander and Make a Difference by Wendy L. Moss, PhD, ABPP provides strategies to become a “positive bystander,” someone who stands up for themselves and others. Two of the ways to be an Upstander include having empathy for others and conflict resolution. Read an excerpt from a chapter of Stand Up! here. Resilient Reads Brilliant Bea by Shaina Rudolph and Mary Vukadinovich is an endearing and empowering story that demonstrates that a learning difference like dyslexia doesn’t define who you are. Despite her struggles with reading and writing, Beatrice is a natural and brilliant storyteller. With the help of a kind-hearted teacher, Beatrice uses an old-fashioned tape recorder so she can speak her words and play them back, as a technique for learning in a whole new way. With her new approach, Beatrice is able to show her classmates who she really has been all along. This book is set in EasyReading, a dyslexia-friendly font. Band Together by Chloe Douglass demonstrates how sometimes peer pressure can be a positive force. Duck loves peace and quiet! When a rowdy band asks him to join the show, he agrees, but gets nervous to perform with them. Why would they want him to play with them? A charming tale about being with friends and making new ones. Hear Band Together read aloud here. Read an interview with the author and illustrator here. Whether your child has been the target of bullying, has witnessed it, or has bullied someone else, reading books about the subject is a great way to start a conversation about this important and sensitive subject. Check out our entire collection of books about bullying. It may also be helpful to look at our collection of books about friendship, race &

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Books to Tackle Bullying 2021-10-14T17:34:09-04:00

Build Your Library: Bullying

School is starting again, either online or in person. While children may have missed seeing their friends and teachers, time at home may have given them a break from bullies. Helping your child navigate social situations and manage interaction with bullies is a challenging and important responsibility for parents and caregivers. These books, from our Build Your Library Collection, can help. Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney, PhD explores the experience of being multiracial, explains microaggression, and provides a resilient response.  Read a post about supporting your biracial child from the Author's Note here. Hear Lulu the One and Only read aloud here. Baxter and Danny Stand Up to Bullying by James M. Foley, DEd follows a pair of friends, Baxter and Danny, as they encounter and learn how to stand up to bullies. Read an excerpt from the Note to Parents and Other Caregivers here. Mind Over Basketball: Coach Yourself to Handle Stress by Jane Weierbach, PhD, and Elizabeth Phillips-Hershey, PhD explores mindfulness as a strategy to handle stress, including bullies. The stressors in Tuck's life are interfering with his effort to make the basketball team. A new mentor teaches Tuck how to manage his anxiety and self-doubt. Read a post about Mind Over Basketball here. Stand Up!: Be an Upstander and Make a Difference by Wendy L. Moss, PhD, ABPP provides strategies to become a "positive bystander" someone who stands up for themselves and others. Two of the ways to be an Upstander include having empathy for others and conflict resolution. Read an excerpt from a chapter of Stand Up! here. Through October 31, 2020, get 25% off your purchase and free shipping when you order books directly from Magination Press through APA.org. Click here to books and use code FF25 at checkout.

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Build Your Library: Bullying 2020-09-01T12:38:40-04:00