The Bestselling What to Do Series Now Available on Kindle

Common childhood experiences and emotions can create big challenges for kids. Magination Press’s What to Do Guides for Kids provide interactive exploration of these common challenges, helping kids manage issues like shyness, perfectionism, separation anxiety, worry, and more.  This highly acclaimed, award-winning series is now available in electronic format for Kindle, as well as in paperback. If your child prefers e-books, or if you want to have a What to Do Guide available on-the-go, the Kindle versions are for you.  Kindle versions of the What to Do series include: What to Do When the News Scares You by Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When Fear Interferes by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When It's Not Fair by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When You Don't Want to Be Apart by Kristen Lavallee, PhD, and Silvia Schneider, Dr. rer. nat. What to Do When You Worry Too Much by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Your Temper Flares by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Mistakes Make You Quake by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When You Feel Too Shy by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD Check out all of our books that are available in a digital format.

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The Bestselling What to Do Series Now Available on Kindle 2021-08-25T19:52:32-04:00

Winning Strategies for Little Athletes

Many parents introduce their children to competitive sports at an early age, as they offer physical benefits and can teach children important lessons in teamwork, sportsmanship, and more. But while sports are mostly intended for fun among kids so young, these competitions can also produce some BIG emotions when things do not go their way. A Feel Better Book for Little Sports by Leah Bowman and Holly Brochmann helps kids navigate their first years of competitive sports by addressing all the great aspects of playing, while also offering tips on how to manage the not so fun side of sports. Here’s an excerpt from the Reader’s Note. Sports are terrific in so many ways. Whether a child has attended a sibling’s sporting events or simply experienced their family watching a favorite team play on TV, they learn very early on that sports equal excitement. Children also quickly figure out that winning is “good” and losing is “bad.” But with a little guidance, kids can discover that there’s so much more to sports than winning and losing. ...with a little guidance, kids can discover that there’s so much more to sports than winning and losing. Your brain gets a boost from all that moving. Adults know that physical activity can help improve your mood, but let your child know that, too! Sports are a great way to teach them about endorphins and how movement can help lower stress, enhance clear thinking, improve confidence, and even help you sleep better. You can still be tough at the same time! It’s also important to teach children that feelings and behaviors are not mutually exclusive. Showing grace and kindness (helping a person from the other team up from the ground) does not mean that you are not a tough or competitive player. You can be both! A good way to teach this is to demonstrate through example. Cheer on your child’s team and talk through the strategy and methods for winning the game. But also model friendly, supportive behaviors toward the opposing team. It’s okay to be proud of what you’ve done. Winning is fun and it feels good. It’s ok to celebrate! Just teach your child to celebrate respectfully. There’s a big difference between saying, “We won!” and “You lost!” But what happens when things don’t go your way? Losing or not performing your best is inevitable. This is especially tough for really young kids whose caregivers have been working to boost their confidence. Competitive sports often give children their first experience with loss, and tempers can happen as a result of those feelings of frustration and disappointment. You do not need to discount those feelings--it IS disappointing when you lose! Sometimes the best thing you can do is acknowledge your child’s feelings and just show that you get it. Above all BE A GOOD SPORT! Unsportsmanlike conduct happens at all levels of sports, and kids will witness this. But they’ll also see acts of kindness--an NFL player helping a player from

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Winning Strategies for Little Athletes 2021-08-23T18:19:01-04:00

Helping Children Manage Big Emotions

Experiencing emotions is a vital part of being human. Emotions give us information, motivate us and prepare us to act, and give others information about how we are feeling. However, emotions can also be difficult to handle, particularly when the intensity of the emotion grows beyond what we can easily manage, as well as when they are more painful emotions like sadness, anxiety, shame, or guilt. When painful emotions become very intense (i.e., become “big” emotions), they tend to lead to impulsive behaviors, hard to control emotional thoughts, and intense physical sensations, such as tight muscles, an upset stomach, or a headache. Learning to manage painful, big emotions and particularly, to catch and soothe those emotions before they get too big, is an important ability for children to develop. Read on for tips on how to teach your child to handle their big emotions.  Name and Normalize Big Emotions We all experience emotions and they are important and helpful - even when they are not easy to experience. Teach your child that we all experience emotions and that they are important and helpful - even when they are not easy to experience. Brainstorm together about the emotions they experience and how they might be helpful. For example, feeling a little nervous before a test motivates them to study. Feeling guilty after saying something unkind reminds them to be more gentle in the future. Crying when they are sad lets an adult know that they might need help or want to talk.  If your child is not sure how to tell the difference between emotions, link emotions to body sensations. For example, anger often shows up as heat in the body while anxiety often causes tight muscles including tense, hunched shoulders and fists or a clenched jaw. The next time your child is experiencing an emotion, gently ask where they are feeling it in their body. This, along with practice noticing and naming emotions, is a foundational step of emotion awareness and regulation. Teach Coping Skills Teach your child a few simple coping skills to soothe their big emotions. It is helpful to match the skill to the intensity of the emotion being experienced as different skills help with different levels of emotional intensity. Kids also often benefit from a visual, such as an emotional thermometer where small (i.e., less intense) emotions are on the bottom part of the thermometer, medium are in the middle, and big are on the top.   A helpful coping skill for when emotions are less intense or “small,” is to practice helpful “self-talk.” This skill can be adapted depending on the situation, but the basic approach is to acknowledge that you are having a tough time and to encourage or coach yourself as you would a friend in the situation. For example, if your child is struggling with homework they might say “this is really hard! At the same time, I’m doing my best and can ask my teacher for help tomorrow.” As another example,

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Helping Children Manage Big Emotions 2021-06-01T23:07:12-04:00