Something Happened in Our Park: Standing Together After Gun Violence

When Miles’s cousin Keisha is injured in a shooting, he realizes people can work together to reduce the likelihood of violence in their community. With help from friends and family, Miles learns to use his imagination and creativity to help him cope with his fears. Hear the authors, Ann Hazzard, PhD, ABPP, Marietta Collins, PhD, and , Marianne Celano, PhD, ABPP read Something Happened in Our Park aloud.

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Something Happened in Our Park: Standing Together After Gun Violence 2021-09-07T16:08:45-04:00

Memory Loss and Love: Helping Children Understand Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

September is National Alzheimer’s Month. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting about 6 percent of people 65 and older. Scientists don’t know what causes Alzheimer’s, but they suspect it’s a combination of many factors. The disease affects parts of the brain that control memory, thought, and language. Alzheimer’s impacts the entire family. Children will notice changes in their loved ones as the disease progresses. My Singing Nana by Pat Mora explores a child’s experience as his grandmother begins to lose her memory.  Here's a repost of an excerpt providing strategies to help kids to understand and cope with a loved one's developing dementia.  Families savor happy memories. Cooking together, singing, reading, telling stories, hosting family gatherings—all of these experiences can create lovely memories. A child who gets to spend time with a beloved grandparent or other senior often develops a special connection with that person. Along with those special memories and connections also come the challenging realities of aging. How do children respond to grandparents or other seniors who may begin to experience memory loss, and where do children have opportunities to share and discuss their confusion, worries, and feelings? Try these strategies: Be truthful with children. Share age appropriate information. In the story, Billy and his grandmother, Nana, have a special bond. They bake, read, and sing together. When Nana begins to have trouble remembering things, Billy is worried. His mother explains that Nana does have trouble remembering things, and that she took Nana to the doctor. The doctor said that Nana sometimes needs their help. Billy’s mother answers his questions and assures him that he and Nana can still do the things they like to do together. Encourage children to share their worries with their parents and other trusted family members or teachers. Children’s questions provide clues about appropriate issues to address with a child and his or her level of understanding. In the story, Billy’s mother notices that he is worried and asks him what is the matter. She listens to his concerns about Nana and answers his questions. Remind children to be polite and patient with their family members. When a loved one exhibits memory loss, a child might not know how to react. Billy’s mother explains that Nana needs their help. When his Nana can’t remember things, Billy and his siblings gently remind her. Model loving, thoughtful behavior that strengthens family bonds. Showing a child that, even though a loved one may be struggling to remember things, including him or her in family experiences sends a powerful message of love and support. In the story, although Nana is beginning to experience the early stages of dementia, her family continues to include her in their daily routines. Billy even figures out a way to draw on his special connection with Nana to include her in a family event by singing with her. Coping with the challenges of aging is difficult for all family members, children and parents alike. Being honest about what is happening, encouraging discussion

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Memory Loss and Love: Helping Children Understand Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia 2021-09-02T14:41:35-04:00

Help Your Little Worrier Stay Calm

A Feel Better Book for Little Worriers helps children understand what worries are and what to do when they are feeling worried. From verses that demonstrate body awareness to coping strategies for kids, A Feel Better Book is not only enjoyable for children to read, but also helpful for both children and caregivers. To learn more about how you can help your child cope with worries, check out our article Stress Management Exercises for Anxious Children.

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The Bestselling What to Do Series Now Available on Kindle

Common childhood experiences and emotions can create big challenges for kids. Magination Press’s What to Do Guides for Kids provide interactive exploration of these common challenges, helping kids manage issues like shyness, perfectionism, separation anxiety, worry, and more.  This highly acclaimed, award-winning series is now available in electronic format for Kindle, as well as in paperback. If your child prefers e-books, or if you want to have a What to Do Guide available on-the-go, the Kindle versions are for you.  Kindle versions of the What to Do series include: What to Do When the News Scares You by Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When Fear Interferes by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When It's Not Fair by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When You Don't Want to Be Apart by Kristen Lavallee, PhD, and Silvia Schneider, Dr. rer. nat. What to Do When You Worry Too Much by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Your Temper Flares by Dawn Huebner, PhD What to Do When Mistakes Make You Quake by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD What to Do When You Feel Too Shy by Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD, and Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD Check out all of our books that are available in a digital format.

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The Bestselling What to Do Series Now Available on Kindle 2021-08-25T19:52:32-04:00
Illustrations of children riding a bicycle, meditating, and playing