teens: 4 Articles

April Is Autism Acceptance Month

April is Autism Acceptance Month. Autism is the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States. 1 in 54 children are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, totaling over 5 million young people and adults.1  Magination Press has a variety of resources for children and teens about Autism and Asperger’s to help them understand and manage their diagnosis. All My Stripes: A Story For Children With Autism by Shaina Rudolph and Danielle Royer "Nobody gets me, Mama!" In the award-winning picture book, Zane the zebra feels different from the rest of his classmates. He worries that all they notice about him is his "autism stripe." With the help of his Mama, Zane comes to appreciate all his stripes — the unique strengths that make him who he is! “Rudolph and Royer shine a light on the autism spectrum, but go a step further and show how endearing, unique and beautiful the children are in this inspiring story about embracing differences.” — Children's Books Heal Asperger's Rules!: How To Make Sense Of School And Friends by Blythe Grossberg A large part of school isn't just taking tests, reading, and writing — it's knowing the rules for behavior in the classroom and learning how to communicate with teachers and classmates. This book makes school easier for kids with Asperger's by explaining the confusing — and often unwritten — rules of the classroom “Grossberg provides an upbeat and supportive guide for readers with Asperger's, covering feelings and emotions, teachers, asking for help, and dealing with bullies…The invaluable advice should help readers navigate new challenges.” — Publishers Weekly Asperger's Teens: Understanding High School For Students On The Autism Spectrum by Blythe Grossberg  For a teen with Asperger's, high school can be a time of great promise and opportunity — to learn more about subjects they're excited about, join clubs and activities that interest them, and make new friends — but it can also be uncomfortable at times. This award-winning book helps them use their strengths and unique personal style to feel more comfortable in high school and to be better able to make friends, understand teachers, and get the grades they are capable of. "High school students who have been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome will find this a welcome tool to add to their support resources. The straightforward tone and achievable tips make this guide approachable for a wide range of readers. Both teachers and counseling staff would be well served to have this title in their collection." — Booklist Autism, The Invisible Cord: A Sibling's Diary by Barbara S. Cain This award-winning book features Jenny, a teen who confides in her diary about what it is like to live with Ezra, her younger brother with autism, and her life with the most "wacky, exasperating, infuriating, amazing younger brother!" “...Cain reminds us that the experience of living with a child with ASD is not limited to parents; siblings are at the forefront of each challenge and every triumph, and they are profoundly affected as

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April Is Autism Acceptance Month 2021-04-12T17:17:17-04:00

Help Your Teen Understand and Manage Their Anger

Sometimes emotions can be very powerful, like the revving engine of a race car. Anger and frustration can feel like they are driving you. Dr. Michael A. Tompkins has created a manual for teens to help them learn to calm anger, manage frustration and irritation, and de-escalate tense situations. This adapted excerpt from his Note to the Reader in Zero to Sixty: A Teen’s Manual to Manage Frustration, Anger, and Everyday Irritations, speaks directly to teens. It explores anger and some first steps teens can take toward controlling it based in cognitive behavioral therapy. High-performance cars can go from zero to 60 in just a few seconds. That’s moving; and that’s what anger can feel like sometimes. One minute you’re cool and calm and then next minute, in a flash, you’re boiling. When that happens, people tell you to chill out or calm down, but no one actually teaches you how to do that. There are tools to control your anger, and you can learn them. Understanding anger is an important first step in building those skills. Own your anger Anger is an interesting emotion. It makes people uncomfortable. Anger can push people away or even frighten them. This makes it hard for people to understand others who are angry in the same way they understand people who are stressed, anxious, or depressed. When people are stressed, anxious, or depressed, others will often sympathize with them and tell them that it isn’t their fault that they feel the way they do. When people are angry, however, they are often blamed for feeling that way because others believe they could calm down if they wanted to. This makes it hard for people to own the anger and ask for help. It’s not easy to own a problem. It takes courage to stare down anger and decide to take it on. Do you see anger as something outside of your control? Do you think that you wouldn’t be angry if people treated you differently? What if: Your teachers didn’t load you with so much homework, Your friends did things your way, or People left you alone? Then you wouldn’t get angry. It’s them, not you, and to a degree that’s true. Other people do play a role. Sometimes people say something that hurts your feelings or treat you unfairly. Sometimes people do these things intentionally, and sometimes accidentally. What you do have control over is how you react to these things. Owning your anger means you don’t blame your friends, your school, your parents, or yourself. Owning your anger is the first step in taking charge of it.   Admit the Benefits of Anger and Give It Back Have you ever lost your temper: To get out of class, homework, or chores, So that you could get your way, or Put someone down so you could feel better about yourself? Part of owning your anger means admitting that sometimes you use anger to help you get what you want. But understanding

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Help Your Teen Understand and Manage Their Anger 2020-11-30T19:43:33-05:00

The Making of TRANS+: An Interview with the Authors

For our last post celebrating Pride Month, Magination Press presents an interview with the co-authors of TRANS+: Love, Sex, Romance, and Being You.  Read about why and how they wrote TRANS+ and their advice for supporting trans+ kids. Magination Press: What inspired you to write TRANS+? Kathryn Gonzales: No book like TRANS+ had ever been written. I could have certainly used a book like TRANS+ growing up, and I knew that the transgender and nonbinary youth I work with at Out Youth needed it too! Even when the writing process got tough, I knew I had to keep going because this book was going to help a lot of youth feel less alone.  Karen Rayne: When Magination Press invited me to write a book about love, sex, and romance for teens who identify as a girl, my first question was whether they had a book for trans and nonbinary youth also planned. They didn’t - until I asked that question and they were immediately enthusiastic. I was lucky enough to find Kathryn as a co-author for this book that desperately needed to be written. MP:  What is TRANS+ about? KG: TRANS+ is a growing-up guide for transgender and nonbinary youth and all the people who love them. We cover a variety of topics like “What is gender?” and coming out to puberty, transition, dating, and relationships! It’s important to understand that TRANS+ is meant to be a starting point for a reader’s journey and we link to many resources in the book and on our website at thetransbook.com.  MP:  TRANS+ is such a comprehensive guide. How did you decide what to include? KG: Even though I am transgender, I didn’t for a moment think I knew what transgender and nonbinary youth growing up in the 21st century wanted to know about. That’s why we sent out a survey to transgender and nonbinary youth all over the country to get their input. A special thanks, of course, to my literal in-house focus group of youth at Out Youth! KR: We asked trans and nonbinary youth what they have questions about - and what they wish they had known at the beginning of their journey into their identity.  MP:  What have reader responses been? KG: I don’t think we’ve received a single response from a reader that wasn’t about their deep and heartfelt gratitude that Karen and I wrote TRANS+. Trans and nonbinary youth tell us it’s exactly what they needed, trans and nonbinary adults tell us it’s exactly what they wished they’d had growing up, and parents tell us that it’s helped them communicate with their youth about being trans, transition, and mental health. MP:  You wrote TRANS+ as a team. What was your process working together? KG: Our writing partnership worked so well because we each took charge of writing chapters about topics in which we were experts. Karen, being a world-renowned sex educator, wrote all of the content about sex, sexual health and reproduction, and healthy relationships. I, as

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The Making of TRANS+: An Interview with the Authors 2020-11-16T21:19:07-05:00