social anxiety: 3 Articles

Dance With Me! Upbeat Books to Celebrate Dance

September 18 is National Dance Day. Whether you love hip hop, ballet, salsa, polka, swing, ballroom, or folk dancing, moving to music is a universal experience. These upbeat Magination Press books celebrate dancing with family, friends, and even on your own. When Nana Dances by Jane Yolen and Maddison Stemple-Piatt Nana can make any object a dancing partner. An umbrella, a broom, even a rake! Both onstage and off, she can shimmy, she can mambo, and do the bunny hop. She’s won prizes and can dance to grandpa’s music or to her own beat. But nothing is more special than when grandma dances with her grandchildren. This fun story is filled with the movement, energy, and laughter that comes when kids dance with their grandparents. Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music by Michael Genhart, PhD When both grandpas, Abuelo and Opa, visit at the same time, they can’t understand each other’s language and there is a lot of silence. The grandson’s clever thinking helps find a way for everyone to share the day together as two cultures become one family. Hector’s Favorite Place by Jo Rooks Hector loves his cozy, snugly, safe home. It's his favorite place to be. Hector loves his home so much that he doesn't often go out, and soon, it starts to affect his friendships. Can Hector find the courage to break out of his comfort zone? Move Your Mood! by Brenda S. Miles, PhD, and Colleen A. Patterson, MA Feeling blah? Here's what to do. Move your body and your mood moves too! Move Your Mood! invites kids and adults to twist, wiggle, shake, hop…and smile! Reading this book with your child is an active and fun way to teach your child about emotions, and introduce the idea that moving our bodies affects the way we feel inside. Ready to start feeling better? Move and groove your way into a better mood!

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Dance With Me! Upbeat Books to Celebrate Dance 2021-09-17T15:46:23-04:00

Make New Friends and Keep the Old…

June 8 is National Best Friend Day. ...One is silver and the other gold. Friendship can be complicated. Friends make life fun and help you through rough patches but making friends and maintaining those relationships can be hard work. Enjoy these Magination Press stories that help kids explore the ins and outs of friendship.  Too Shy to Say Hi by Shannon Anderson This rhyming picture book will help kids navigate difficulties of shyness and social anxiety. Shelli used to be content in her little world, thinking that her pet friends were enough. Readers will relate as Shelli takes brave steps toward breaking out of her shell to make friends at school. Includes a Note to Parents and Caregivers with more information about shyness and social anxiety. Hear Too Shy to Say Hi read aloud Read an excerpt from the Reader’s Note in Too Shy to Say Hi Baby Blue by Judi Abbot Baby Blue is a little boy who lives in a blue world, full of blue trees, flowers, and animals. One day, he accidentally tears a hole in the world and a strange light pours in. Through the hole, he can see a world that isn’t blue, and another little person like him. Though Baby Blue is scared, he overcomes his fear and introduces himself to Baby Yellow. Hear Baby Blue read aloud Read an interview with Judi Abbot about creating Baby Blue The Friendship Book by Wendy Moss, PhD This book helps middle-grade readers figure out what they want out of their friendships, how to be a good friend, how to resolve conflicts, and much more. Full of practical tips, insightful quizzes, and relatable examples, The Friendship Book is the resource kids need to figure out friendship. Read an excerpt from The Friendship Book Band Together by Chloe Douglass Duck loves peace and quiet! When a rowdy band asks him to join the show, he agrees, but gets nervous to perform with them. Why would they want him to play with them? A charming tale about being with friends and making new ones. Hear Band Together read aloud Read an interview with Chloe Douglass about creating Band Together Giraffe Asks For Help by Nyasha M. Chikowore Gary the giraffe is old enough to reach the leaves on the trees all by himself. However, he simply can't reach on his own. With a little guidance from his friends, Gary learns that it's okay to ask for help. Hear Giraffe Asks for Help read aloud Read an excerpt from the Note to Parents and Caregivers in Giraffe Asks for Help Three Little Birds by Lysa Mullady When two birds go find worms, they don't invite their friend and his feelings are hurt. So he decides to start a rumor, which quickly spirals out of control. Can he make things right before it's too late? Browse our complete list of more than 20 books about friendship.

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Make New Friends and Keep the Old… 2021-06-07T23:33:53-04:00

Help Your Child Tame Worry Thoughts with Mindful Breathing

Worry, or anxiety, is a normal reaction to something dangerous in our environment. In fact, anxiety helps us avoid something that is likely to cause us harm. However, children may be prone to excessive worry and worry about events that are unlikely to happen. When such anxiety negatively impacts a child’s everyday life, a mental health professional my diagnose an anxiety disorder. At the root of anxiety-related disorders are worry thoughts. This excerpt from the Note to Parents and Caregivers by Ara J. Schmitt, PhD, in Magination Press’s book, Mindful Bea and the Worry Tree, by Gail Silver, helps parents understand worry thoughts and provides a strategy for parents to help their children cope with them. Understanding Worry Thoughts Psychologists refer to worry thoughts as “cognitive distortions.” In Mindful Bea and the Worry Tree, Bea experiences at least five kinds of worry thoughts. Her first worry thought is: Must or should thinking: thinking that things must or should be a certain way. For example, Bea thinks her birthday party must be perfect. This often can lead a second distortion, such as black-or white thinking. Black-or-white thinking: an all-or-nothing way of thinking, allowing for no middle ground. Bea appears to believe that her party will either be perfect and everyone will have fun, or the party will be disastrous with unhappy guests. In her mind, it does not seem possible to have a disappointing hiccup along the way, but still a great party overall. The series of worry thoughts continues, when, as a result of these unreasonable thoughts, Bea appears to jump to conclusions. Jump to conclusions: to form negative conclusions based on little or no evidence. Bea’s series of worry thoughts leads her to jump to the conclusion that her friends will call her names or not want to stay at her party if it’s not flawless. The worry thought that Bea appears to have most often is called catastrophizing. Castastrophizing: expecting negative events to happen. Bea asks “what if?” repeatedly: “what if there isn’t enough cake?” “what if no one comes?”. This isn’t likely to happen, but Bea worries about every possible negative outcome. She’s able to do this because she is filtering. Filtering: filtering out all positive thoughts and evidence in favor of negative thoughts. Bea filters out thoughts and evidence that her party will go well, like her experience at previous parties and her mother’s preparation for the current party, in favor of negative thoughts. How Parents Can Help Parents can explain that the body and mind are connected, and calming the body can help calm the mind. The worries can still be there for now, but the child can use their breath to help their body feel better. During the tense moments of worry thoughts, parents can lead their child through this simple relaxation exercise: In a calm, reassuring voice, prompt your child to put a pause on their worry thoughts. It can help to give them a  concrete suggestion, such as telling their worries

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Help Your Child Tame Worry Thoughts with Mindful Breathing 2019-11-19T17:44:12-05:00