self esteem: 5 Articles

Fostering Healthy Body Image, Part I

We are all different shapes, sizes, and colors, each of us special in our own way. Blossom and Bud by Frank J. Sileo, PhD was written to help children respect, accept and appreciate how their own and others’ bodies are beautiful and different in their own ways. It was also written to foster discussion in a safe and comfortable environment with the caregivers in their lives.  Understanding individual differences and body diversity may help children build self-esteem, feel kindness toward themselves and others, practice healthy eating, have more realistic expectations of their appearance, and possess a healthy body image.  In his Note to Adult Gardeners in Blossom and Bud, Dr. Sileo provides suggestions about nurturing a positive body image in children. Here’s an excerpt explaining body image and when to seek professional help. We’ll post a second excerpt with tips for fostering a healthy body image. What Is Body Image? Body image is how a person feels about and views their body, which contributes to their own self-image. Children can develop a positive or negative perception of their body.  A child with a positive body image feels comfortable about their body. As a result, they display more confidence, take better care of their body, and have higher self-esteem. They tend to have more energy and engage in physical activities. A child with a negative body image tends to feel less satisfied with their body and may feel more anxious, self-conscious, and isolated from others. They may be more preoccupied with calories, weight, or food intake; unfairly compare themselves with others; have lower self-esteem; and engage in disordered eating. The way children see themselves and others may be based on standards set forth by others in their lives. It is difficult to ignore the images of the “ideal” body conveyed to our children by many forms of media. Peers can also be powerful influences on children’s perceptions of self. Parents and other adults in their lives may also be sending messages directly or indirectly about how children’s bodies should look and how they should feel about their bodies. There is a tendency in our culture to favor bodies that are thin, muscular, or “perfect.” Of course, a “perfect” body does not exist, and focusing on perfection can lead to frustration, disappointment, and other mental health issues. As parents and caregivers, we want to help encourage children to develop healthy mindsets and realistic expectations about their bodies, and to learn how to take care of their bodies through eating healthy and getting regular exercise. When Body Image Becomes a Growing Problem Being concerned about body image and at times being self-conscious about one’s appearance is a typical part of growing up. However, if you should notice your child becoming depressed being bullied struggling with their self-esteem skipping meals engaging in severe dieting withdrawing from others making repeated, negative statements about themselves like “I hate my body,” or “I’m ugly,” or engaging in self-harm behavior it is best to seek consultation with

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Fostering Healthy Body Image, Part I 2021-05-13T15:49:53-04:00

Books to Help Your Child Develop a Healthy Self-Concept

In recognition of International Boost Self-Esteem Month, we’re highlighting some of our books to help your child explore and develop their sense of self. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, when everyone’s usual experiences and interactions have been disrupted, kids may be feeling less self-assured. These stories can help you and your child explore ways to foster a positive self-concept.   Being Me: A Kid’s Guide to Boosting Confidence and Self-Esteem by Wendy L. Moss, PhD explores confidence and provides tips and advice to build it. It also provides tools to explore strengths and feel more confident in school or with friends.     Blossom and Bud by Frank J. Sileo, PhD explores body image and will help kids love themselves all around, no matter their shape or size.       Fantastic You! by Danielle Dufayet celebrates individuality and encourages children to practice self-care, including positive self-talk and self-compassion. Hear Ms. Dufayet read Fantastic You! aloud here.     I Want Your Moo: A Story for Children About Self-Esteem by Marcella Bakur Weiner, EdD, PhD, and Jill Neimark explores how it feels to not like yourself and how empowering it can be to embrace your uniqueness in a fun, rhyming picture book.     Lucy’s Light by Jo Rooks Lucy is a lightning bug and the most talented flyer in the squad. There's just one problem: she doesn't light up! A sweet story which shines a light on inner confidence, self-acceptance, and courage. Lucy learns that doing a good deed will always make you shine bright! Read a post about Lucy’s Light and fostering a healthy self-concept here.   Neon Words: 10 Brilliant Ways to Light Up Your Writing by Marge Pellegrino and Kay Sather provides writing prompts and activities to connect the word-organizing part of the brain to the free-ranging imagination. Playing with words can boost confidence and help you be more present in life. Print out sample pages from Neon Words here.     So Many Smarts by Michael Genhart, PhD explores and celebrates all kinds of smarts—nature smarts, people smarts, music smarts, spatial smarts, and more. Hear Dr. Genhart read So Many Smarts! aloud here.     Why Am I Blue? A Story About Being Yourself by Kalli Dakos Everyone is different, and accepting differences in oneself and others can be challenging. Why am I Blue explores this concept and helps children toward understanding and accepting their own as well as others' differences and similarities. Read an interview with Kalli Dakos here.   Nurturing a healthy self-concept is a life-long task. Sharing books and talking with your child about this process can help them learn to recognize their strengths and build resilience.

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Books to Help Your Child Develop a Healthy Self-Concept 2021-02-22T20:01:11-05:00

Build Your Library: Nurturing Your Gifts

Everyone has different gifts and abilities. Recognizing and nurturing one's gifts helps build confidence and a positive self-image. As kids get ready to head back to school, whether in person or online, they may be questioning their "smarts." These books, from Magination Press's Build Your Library Collection, can help you support your child as they explore and develop their gifts and sense of self. Being Me: A Kid's Guide to Boosting Confidence and Self-Esteem by Wendy L. Moss, PhD explores confidence and provides tips and advice to build it. It also provides tools to explore strengths and feel more confident in school or with friends. Fantastic You! by Danielle Dufayet celebrates individuality and encourages children to practice self-care, including positive self-talk and self-compassion. Hear Ms. Dufayet read Fantastic You! aloud here. I Want Your Moo: A Story for Children About Self-Esteem by Marcella Bakur Weiner, EdD, PhD, and Jill Neimark explores how it feels to not like yourself and how empowering it can be to embrace your uniqueness in a fun, rhyming picture book. Neon Words: 10 Brilliant Ways to Light Up Your Writing by Marge Pellegrino and Kay Sather provides writing prompts and activities to connect the word-organizing part of the brain to the free-ranging imagination. Playing with words can boost confidence and help you be more present in life. Print out sample pages from Neon Words here. So Many Smarts by Michael Genhart, PhD explores and celebrates all kinds of smarts—nature smarts, people smarts, music smarts, spatial smarts, and more. Hear Dr. Genhart read So Many Smarts! aloud here. Through October 31, 2020, get 25% off your purchase and free shipping when you order books directly from Magination Press through APA.org. Click here to books and use code FF25 at checkout.

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Build Your Library: Nurturing Your Gifts 2020-08-27T12:14:07-04:00