feelings: 9 Articles

You Are Your Strong

Inside you, your Strong is a light that shines like the sun. Sometimes you have to find your Strong all by yourself. Kids can feel big emotions. Sometimes other people can help them manage those feelings, but sometimes kids have to handle big emotions on their own. Hear author Danielle Dufayet read You Are Your Strong aloud. With diverse characters and scenes featuring a range of different family relationships — from parents, to grandparents, to an older sister in the military — this book shows kids that they will have help along the way to being strong and in control.

Read More
You Are Your Strong 2021-06-26T14:45:47-04:00

Magination Press Learning at Home: Writing and Doodling Activities for Kids

The life changes and uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have people all over the world feeling a mix of emotions.  Children are working through a lot of feelings as they navigate distance learning, being separated from their friends (and possibly family members), cancellation of their extracurricular activities, and being stuck at home. Parents have a lot to cope with too, especially managing their children's learning in this unprecedented situation. Writing and doodling can help kids (and adults) explore their feelings and creativity. Two books from Magination Press can help kids develop these forms of expression.  How Do You Doodle?: Drawing My Feelings and Emotions by Elise Gravel and Neon Words: 10 Brilliant Ways to Light Up Your Writing by Marge Pellegrino and Kay Sather provide drawing games to explore feelings, writing prompts, and book-making activities.  Here are some pages from How Do You Doodle? and two chapters from Neon Words for your kids to try! How Do You Doodle? is a book for your child to doodle, scribble, and draw out their thoughts, emotions, and feelings.  It is made up of doodle games that let your child explore the way they feel, name their emotions, and think about how they feel in different situations. Some thoughts and feelings may be hard to share, but lots of kids feel better after they doodle about these things. And just what is a doodle, you ask? A doodle is a special kind of drawing that happens all on its own—spontaneously. A doodle just flows from you, like when you are talking on the phone and not really paying attention and you start drawing spirals and circles and polka dots and bunnies. Some people think of doodles as the opposite of drawing—you're not supposed to be drawing something specific. Doodles come completely from the heart. They are expressions of your emotions and what you are feeling. Doodling can provide an outlet for the mix of emotions children are feeling due to the pandemic experience. Neon Words: 10 Brilliant Ways to Light Up Your Writing, helps young writers  learn about creative writing by honoring, strengthening, and playing with their ideas and words. Writing activities can spark imagination and allow young writers to make their writing more powerful, but they can also help kids engage with words to be more present in life and to use language arts techniques for self-discovery and emotional well-being. Creative writing is a powerful form of self expression that can help your child explore their feelings, experiences, and dreams, as well as build empathy for and understanding of others. Expressive writing about life helps people, among other things: get healthy! Research shows that people who write about emotional upheavals require fewer doctor visits and are generally happier. combat depression! Writing a gratitude journal helps with mood. Expressing yourself lets you ditch your stress for a while. build their brain! People best express themselves in different ways–through words, music, movement. Some people prefer to be alone to be inspired. Others

Read More
Magination Press Learning at Home: Writing and Doodling Activities for Kids 2020-05-04T00:28:40-04:00

Fostering Resilience in the Time of COVID-19: Tips for Helping Your Child

Resilience—the ability to bounce back from a difficult situation—this isn’t just something people are born with. Dr. Wendy Moss, author of Magination Press book, Bounce Back: How to Be a Resilient Kid, provides kids with exercises and strategies to build resilience. During this especially challenging time, the chapters about handling decisions, disappointments, and new challenges and about coping with unchangeable situations can be useful.  In this blog post, Dr. Moss offers insights and tips to help your child cope with the stress and life changes created by the COVID-19 pandemic.  A few months ago, most of us could not have anticipated the changes in lifestyle and the way COVID-19 could infiltrate our communities and cause fear, illness, and even death. So, how can we support children as they try to cope with staying home, not being in school or in extracurricular activities, not being able to follow their favorite sports teams, not seeing friends, and possibly knowing that all these changes are due to the presence of a dangerous virus?  This blog provides strategies to help children deal with the general stresses created by the pandemic, not specific situations such as someone they know being ill with or having died from the virus.  Focus On Yourself Children often judge whether a situation is scary, out-of-control, or manageable by watching and listening to trusted adults. As you read some of the tips to help your children, try them on yourself first so you can convey that you are able to cope with this situation that is out of your control. Support Your Child Casually talk with your children about their understanding of, and feelings about, what is happening in their world. Talk to each child individually since the conversation may end up being different depending upon their age and personality. They may have inaccurate information that makes it even more scary.   Let your children know what you and your family can do and are in control of (e.g., staying home; proper hygiene) and that grown-ups have a plan to deal with the virus, even though it will take time. Just make sure that you believe what you say before reassuring your child! Ask how your children feel about the changes in their daily activities. Some children may not be anxious because they like the extra time at home. However, some children are overwhelmed by the change in their regular routine and their fears of illness. Just being able to share these feelings can be a relief for many children. This time at home can be an opportunity. Ask your kids to share their ‘wish list’ of family activities. You can also add some. Having everyone at home can be a great time to play games, teach each other about interests, tell stories about ancestors, or make up silly stories.   Since we must physically distance ourselves from each other, this is a great time to look for creative ways to connect or reconnect with friends or family. Encourage your child to

Read More
Fostering Resilience in the Time of COVID-19: Tips for Helping Your Child 2020-04-29T20:45:00-04:00