feelings: 6 Articles

Magination Press Family Learning At Home: Activity Books to Explore Feelings

Learning about emotions and relationships is a life-long task. Every day, parents and caregivers help children learn to identify, manage, and express feelings in a healthy way and to develop strong and healthy relationships. The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified that task, as people, young and old, all over the world are coping with anxiety, fear, sadness, loneliness, and uncertainty brought on by the health crisis, and parents are managing their children's learning at home. A new series of activity books, just published by Magination Press, provides kids the opportunity to work through the feelings they may be having and sometimes complicated sibling relationships. Written by renowned French parenting expert Isabelle Filliozat, The Find Out Files activity books explore feelings and the experience of having siblings. Using activities, stickers, and funny illustrations, these books make it fun for kids to discover "what makes you, YOU!" The Find Out Files provide a unique and engaging platform for social-emotional learning. Each book has drawing activities, quizzes, crafts, and stickers, as well as an extensive note for parents and caregivers with tips and tools for exploring the topic. There are four books in the series: My Emotions My Emotions is a fun-filled tool for kids to discover self-expression and awareness. It offers kids all sorts of information to nourish and appreciate their emotional life. Young readers will learn how to name their emotions, understand and accept their feelings, and develop emotional self-awareness so they can get on with the business of being a kid. My Fears Everyone can be less afraid with practice and feel more confident and sure of themselves. This not-so-scary activity book helps kids understand why they get fearful and reassure them that everyone feels afraid sometimes. Children discover how some fears and worries are useful and how to deal with other fears that are not helpful. My Fears can also help kids face their fears and learn to take chances, have fun, and be a less afraid kid! My Anger My Anger will help kids understand that getting angry is a normal part of life. It may be a bit uncomfortable at times, but it’s OK if kids need to be mad! Children explore anger through fun activities coupled with humorous illustrations and discover what it means to be angry, why it happens to everyone, and how to better handle it. Allowing children to work through their anger helps them better understand themselves, others, and the world, and will help them establish their sense of self and self-confidence. My Siblings This book offers activities to help kids get along with their brothers and sisters. Kids think that they are expected to love their brothers and sisters unconditionally, but sibling relationships can be really complicated. My Siblings covers jealousy, fairness, sharing, the parent-child relationship, and tons more. It helps kids find a common ground with their siblings if things get too fraught or upsetting. Young readers will figure out how to navigate frustrating situations, understand their sibling's perspective, talk about family

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Magination Press Family Learning At Home: Activity Books to Explore Feelings 2020-05-31T20:45:49-04:00

A Box of Butterflies

What does love feel like? What does love feel like to you? A box of butterflies? A colorful dancing kite? Everyone has feelings—and we all experience feelings in different ways. Join Ruby as she describes different emotions to her friend, Robot, when Magination Press author, Jo Rooks, reads A Box of Butterflies aloud! Dr. Elizabeth McCallum wrote the Note to Parents and Caregivers for A Box of Butterflies. Click here to read an excerpt providing guidance about how to support children's emotional development. For downloadable activity pages created for A Box of Butterflies, click here.

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A Box of Butterflies 2020-05-19T15:17:23-04:00

Exploring Feelings with Mindfulness

The uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has everyone feeling a wide mix of feelings: anxiety, boredom, grief, confusion, frustration, and loneliness to name a few. Helping children recognize and identify their feelings is an important life skill that will be useful long after the pandemic is over. This repost from April 2018 from Magination Press author Lauren Rubenstein, JD, PsyD, explores how we can use mindfulness to examine emotions in a calm, thoughtful way. Take a minute right now to pay attention to what’s going on around you. What do you hear or see? Do you notice anything new? Now, turn your attention inward. What are you thinking, and how do you feel? Mindfulness—as you just experienced—is tuning into yourself and paying attention to the present moment without judging or analyzing what you are thinking or feeling. Although it seems quite simple, it is not easy. Our busy minds are constantly darting and drifting, telling stories about what has happened in the past and what might happen in the future. For children and teenagers, mindfulness is a powerful tool that can enhance many aspects of well-being. As parents and professionals, we can encourage children to be mindful, to cultivate emotional intelligence through their senses, and to reflect on what they learn. Linking Mindfulness and Emotions In order to connect mindfulness to our emotions, we can use the idea of “visiting” our feelings. We can encourage children and teenagers to sense, explore, and befriend all of their feelings with acceptance and equanimity. Emotions and feelings are neither good nor bad, neither acceptable nor unacceptable. Rather, they are simply present-moment experiences of felt sensations. Instead of trying to suppress or undo feelings, we invite children to explore their feelings with their senses and even converse with them. Awareness of how feelings can lodge in the body, as conveyed by common expressions like “a pit in the stomach” or “a lump in the throat” is a form of emotional intelligence. This awareness helps children and teenagers handle any feelings that may arise with equanimity. It also helps them mindfully gain sensitivity to their bodies as rich kaleidoscopes of information. They can cultivate this emotional intelligence through their senses by learning to explore the range of emotions they encounter within themselves on a daily basis. Encouraging Mindfulness Mindfulness can take many forms. Physical practice includes yoga, tai chi, martial arts, and even mindful walking. In fact, any activity can be done mindfully—for example, brushing your teeth, putting on your socks, or practicing the piano. There are many simple exercises you can do at home to help teach your child to be mindful. Reflection activities can be introduced seamlessly into your family routine. Remember: “Short times, many times” is ideal, both in terms of cultivating a mindful brain and fitting practice into busy schedules. For example, before a family meal, have each person at the table name three things they are grateful for. Discuss where the food came from and express gratitude for

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Exploring Feelings with Mindfulness 2020-05-12T23:05:04-04:00