empathy: 5 Articles

Loving-kindness Meditation: Five Pointers to Help Kids Get Started

Thinking good thoughts about themselves and others can help kids be happier and healthier. Loving-kindness meditation toward themselves and others can comfort and strengthen young hearts. Loving-kindness is a kind of heart meditation that consists of sending of sending love, kindness, and compassion by directing positive thoughts, good intentions, or well wishes toward ourselves and others. When people practice loving-kindness meditation on a regular basis, they feel a sense of goodness about themselves and others. It produces a reaction in the brain similar to when one engages in acts of kindness, producing positive feelings which can lead to positive behaviors. Practicing loving-kindness meditation has been shown to: Decrease stress and anxiety Increase feelings of hope Reduce feelings of anger  Increase empathy Increase feelings of self-esteem and decrease self-criticism In Magination Press book, Bee Heartful: Spread Loving-Kindness by Frank J. Sileo, PhD, Bentley Bee sends loving-kindness thoughts to himself and others, and can feel his heart growing. This excerpt from the “Note to Adult Beekeepers” describes how to practice loving-kindness meditation with children. Loving-kindness meditation is great for kids because it is more concrete and structured than other forms of meditation. The child recites specific phases and brings up images in their minds of the people they are sending loving-kindness to.  It’s important that children understand that when they send loving-kindness thoughts to others, it may not change the other person or how that person feels about them. Loving-kindness does not work like magic or serve as some type of spell on another person. The meditation is more focused on the meditator developing loving-kindness toward others. Getting Started Mediation is a quiet activity, so you want to choose a place for your child that is free from distractions. It can be a room in your home, someplace outside like a garden or patio, or any place without interruptions.  They can sit on the floor, a mat, a pillow or in a chair, or lie down. They can close their eyes or cast their eyes downward and a few feet in front of them. This will help avoid any visual distractions. Your child can place one or both hands on their heart and take three deep breaths. Ask your child to repeat these phrases silently in their head a few times. May I be happy. May I be healthy. May I be safe. May I be peaceful. After your child sends loving-kindness intentions toward themselves, they can use the same intention toward other people. Keep it short at first Sitting still and focusing can be challenging for children and adults alike. Keeping meditation short in the beginning can be helpful in maintaining young children’s interest, attention, and focus. For young children, 3-5 minutes is a good starting point. You can gradually increase the time as children mature and their practice grows. Mix up the loving-kindness intentions Your child can vary the practice of loving-kindness meditation by varying who they pick to send intentions to. A common approach is to send loving-kindness

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Loving-kindness Meditation: Five Pointers to Help Kids Get Started 2019-12-16T14:27:42-05:00

Three Ways to Help Your Child Build Empathy

As a parent, helping a child become a confident and compassionate member of a community involves helping them develop healthy self-esteem, respect for everyone, and the ability to forgive themselves and others. In Magination Press book Red Yellow Blue, author Lysa Mullady suggests these strategies to foster empathy and cooperation: Developing Healthy Self-Esteem As caregivers, we cultivate a strong self-image in our children by helping them discover their unique talents. To develop positive self-worth in a child, start with open and honest dialog. Ask questions about what they like and prefer. When a caregiver acknowledges a child’s preferences, they validate the child’s unique likes. Providing opportunities for children to choose what they like, and valuing their choices, guides children to feel special for who they are. Encourage children to explore and develop their unique interests. Start by taking notice of what they choose to do with their independent time. Observing kids doing what they like to do may help parents uncover unique capabilities like artististic creativity, natural athleticism, or scientific curiosity.  Encourage kids to try new things often. It’s not usual for a child’s interests to change. Look for enjoyment, not proficiency. A child may love an activity, but have to work hard to master it. It is more important that a child is trying and having fun than it is to be the most talented in the arena. Having a strong sense of purpose and accomplishment are also essential to healthy self-esteem. When children are given a responsibility, their actions help the whole family. Look for age-appropriate jobs kids can do in daily routines. Then, make the connection between the child’s efforts and the positive effect they have on others. Putting their shoes away keeps everyone safe from tripping over them. Taking plates from the table to the sink makes a big job easier for the person doing the washing. Point out how everyone benefits from the child’s assistance.  Promoting Respect for Everyone Self-respect is feeling good about who you are. Dignity is feeling worthy of honor and treating others with the same admiration. We are all important as individuals. We also live in communities with others. Young children are, by nature, self-centered. They see the world as it relates to themselves and their own experiences. As they grow, they need opportunities to develop social skills and empathy. Positive communication is necessary to work productively in a group. Practicing active listening and speaking with children by picking a topic and talking about it. Reflect what the child says and follow up with a question. It doesn’t matter what is discussed; make bantering back and forth fun. When a child is upset, teach them how to talk about their feelings. While using a quiet voice, fill in the blanks: “I feel ______ when _____ .” It is essential that children learn how to speak to others in a peaceful way, even when frustrated. Relating to others in a positive way is the key to collaboration. Fostering Forgiveness for Self

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Three Ways to Help Your Child Build Empathy 2019-07-15T13:04:42-04:00