emotions: 4 Articles

Books to Help Foster a Healthy Relationship with Food

As a parent or caregiver, it feels like you are always feeding a child. Helping your child develop a healthy relationship with food is an important parenting task. In recognition of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, February 22-28, we featured books about food and eating that can help you with a variety of concerns.     Princess Penelopea Hates Peas: A Tale of Picky Eating and Avoiding Catastropeas by Susan D. Sweet, PhD and Brenda S. Miles, PhD Once upon a time there was a princess named Penelopea. Penelopea lived in Capital Pea, where people ate peas by the pound — pureed, poached, and pan-fried! There was just one problem. Penelopea hated peas. So she came up with a plan — but it led to a catastropea of epic proportions! Eventually, in an effort to make peas disappear from the kingdom forever, she tries just one pea…then another… then another…and discovers they are positively pea-licious after all. Includes a section for parents and caregivers with ideas for introducing picky eaters to new options and encouraging children to eat a variety of healthy foods. “Picky eaters will relate to this story, and the end notes give parents lots of great advice on how to broaden their children's horizons when it comes to eating.” —Mom’s Radius Read interviews with the book’s authors: Meet Magination Press Author Brenda S. Miles Meet Magination Press Author Susan Sweet   Max Archer, Kid Detective: The Case of the Recurring Stomachaches by Howard J. Bennett, MD Meet Max. Max Archer, Kid Detective. Max helps kids solve problems. Max's friend Emily has stomachaches. A lot of them! So, Max and Emily investigate the big three causes of stomachaches — lactose intolerance, constipation, and stress — and determine what causes Emily's stomach to hurt. Without even realizing it, Emily has been under stress, so much that her tummy feels it! Using kid-friendly stress-busting strategies, Emily learns how to get back on track and feel better. Be sure to check out the extra fun activities at the end of the book. There’s a Q&A section at the end written just for parents. “With a casual question-and-answer format and colorful cartoon illustrations, the title follows Max's explanations to Emily — and the reader — about how digestion takes place and the three main causes of a stomachache: lactose intolerance, stress, and constipation…kids will enjoy learning about basic body functions, which are references in a diagram that traces the route of the digestive tract 'from start to rather gross finish.' A final section 'just for parents' adds more.” —Booklist   Full Mouse, Empty Mouse: A Tale of Food and Feelings by Diane Zeckhausen, PhD What can two little mice do when they are chased by the cat, hounded by the dog, and threatened by the deadly mousetrap? Billy Blue tries eating more food to soothe his distress, and Sally Rose stops eating altogether. But when stuffing and starving themselves don't help, they learn to look for answers in their hearts, and

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Books to Help Foster a Healthy Relationship with Food 2021-02-23T15:13:17-05:00

The Benefits of Expressive Writing

Expressive writing has many benefits. Writing about life helps people, among other things: get healthy! Research shows that people who write about emotional upheavals require fewer doctor visits and are generally happier. combat depression! Writing a gratitude journal helps with mood. Expressing yourself lets you ditch your stress for a while. build their brain! People best express themselves in different ways--through words, music, movement. Some people prefer to be alone to be inspired. Others think best by talking to people. Trying a variety of writing activities can spur new ways of thinking, resulting in stronger, smarter writers! Magination Press's book, Neon Words: 10 Brilliant Ways to Light Up Your Writing, provides young writers with writing prompts and book-making activities to help them learn about creative writing by honoring, strengthening, and playing with their ideas and words.  Writing activities can spark imagination and allow young writers to make their writing more powerful, but they can also help kids engage with words to be more present in life and to use language arts techniques for self-discovery and emotional well-being. Take a writing activity about antagonists, for example. In the Villainous Voices activity, writers are invited to think about a disagreement they've had with someone else, but from their adversary's point of view. In a story, the reader sides with the protagonist: the main character, the lead actor. It's the character we find ourselves rooting for. The antagonist, on the other hand, is often the one who causes problems: the villain, the one who creates the story's tension. They're the character we hope gets the short end of the stick. Have you ever read The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by "A. Wolf"? (The author is really Jon Scieszka.) As the title suggests, you don't usually hear the wolf's take on the classic folk tale. In Wicked, Gregory Maguire writes a back story for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, giving the villain--that is, the Wicked Witch of the West--the leading role; this is a complete departure from the original.Now it's your turn. List a few people with whom you've had a disagreement. People you've argued with. People who see a situation from a different vantage point than you. Anyone in your life is fair game: Your mother Your father A sibling Other relative A friend or ex-friend A teacher A pet Think about the argument: Where were you? (scene) What happened? (action) What was said? (dialog) If it helps to take notes first, or jot down key points, go for it! Now retell that story, only this time as the person you clashed with. Invite them to speak as the protagonist. Look for the positive thinking that you couldn't see in the heat of emotion. Be honest. What do you think motivated them--and now you? Why would you want to do this? Writing-wise, it helps you get into the head of each of your characters to make them more complex, authentic, and honest. You want them to ring true, even

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The Benefits of Expressive Writing 2019-06-26T15:47:07-04:00

How Not to “Lose” Your Temper

Mindfulness is the opposite of "losing" your temper.  Don't get me wrong -- mindfulness doesn't mean you don't feel anger.  Being mindful means that you pay attention to what you're feeling, rather than just acting on it.  Anger is part of all relationships. It's acting on it mindlessly, with words or actions, that compromises our parenting (and other partnerships).

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How Not to “Lose” Your Temper 2018-08-01T08:21:07-04:00