Leadership & Inclusion

No Name Calling! Books to Fight Bullying

In recognition of No Name-Calling Week, we’re highlighting useful stories about bullying. No Name-Calling Week was created by K-12 teachers and students to end name calling and bullying in schools. Children experience bullying in a variety of ways and in different places. It happens online and in person. There can be full blown name-calling and physical threats. Even more subtle, but still hurtful, slights and microagressions can cause kids some unease. Here are a few middle-grade nonfiction and picture books that can help with bullying. You can see all Magination Press bullying titles here.   Stand Up!: Be an Upstander and Make a Difference by Wendy L. Moss PhD Do you want to be an Upstander who makes the world a better place by standing up to bullying and injustice in your school, home, or community? If so, this book is for you! You may doubt that one kid can make a difference. You can't fly like Wonder Woman or scale walls like Spiderman, but you could be a hero to someone else by speaking up. Small changes can lead to bigger and bigger changes! Chock full of quizzes, examples, practical advice, and small steps you can take in your real life, Stand Up!: Be an Upstander and Make a Difference takes readers through the ways to be an Upstander, including being kind to yourself, having empathy for others, spreading kindness, and dealing with conflicts.   Read an adapted chapter from Stand Up!   The Hero Handbook by Matt Langdon Heroes take chances, do hard things, and sometimes even change the world. To become a hero, kids can surround themselves with supportive people, boost their self-esteem and self-awareness, find their passion, and have the courage to make things happen. This book shows them how to be the hero of their own story and discover their own hero journey. What makes a hero? Activists, advocates, allies, and friends. Sometimes heroes are our parents, teachers, or siblings. The truth is, heroes are inside everyone, and kids can and discover their inner hero, too!   Baxter and Danny Stand Up to Bullying by James M. Foley, DEd Baxter the Bunny is the fastest animal in the forest. Danny the Bear is the best dancer. Baxter and Danny like to run and dance together in the forest...until Buford Blue Jay comes along. Buford makes up mean names for all the animals in the forest. With the help of Queen Beth of the Bees, Baxter and Danny learn how to start feeling better, and help the other animals in the forest feel better too. Together, they are able to stand up to Buford's bullying! Includes a Note to Parents and Other Caregivers with more information about bullying and strategies for building self-esteem and resilience in children. Read an excerpt from Baxter and Danny Stand Up to Bullying’s Note to Parents and Other Caregivers. Ouch Moments: When Words Are Used in Hurtful Ways by Michael Genhart, PhD When a bee stings, Ouch! That hurts! When your

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No Name Calling! Books to Fight Bullying 2021-01-19T12:13:59-05:00

Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with Books About Social Justice

In observance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and in recognition of the Black Lives Matter movement, we’re featuring books about social justice. Whether through daily life or seeing events on the news, your child may have experiences or questions about race, ethnicity, social justice, or inclusion issues they want to talk about. Age-appropriate books for kids about race, ethnicity, and identity can help you explore the topic with your child. Here are just a few titles in our Race & Ethnicity, Social Justice, and Identity collection. Check out the entire collection here. Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney, PhD Lulu loves her family, but people are always asking, “What are you?” Lulu hates that question. Her brother inspires her to come up with a “power phrase” so she can easily express who she is, not what she is. Includes a Note to Readers from the author, sharing her experience as a multiracial person. Hear Lulu the One and Only read aloud and read an excerpt from the Author’s Note. Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice By Marianne Celano, PhD, ABPP, Marietta Collins, PhD, and Ann Hazzard, PhD, ABPP Emma and Josh heard that something happened in their town. A Black man was shot by the police. "Why did the police shoot that man?" "Can police go to jail?" Something Happened in Our Town follows two families — one White, one Black — as they discuss a police shooting of a Black man in their community. The story aims to answer children's questions about such traumatic events, and to help children identify and counter racial injustice in their own lives. Includes an extensive Note to Parents and Caregivers with guidelines for discussing race and racism with children, child-friendly definitions, and sample dialogues. Hear Something Happened in Our Town read aloud.   Marvelous Maravilloso: Me and My Beautiful Family by Carrie Lara, PsyD    The world is full of different colors...hundreds of colors, everywhere. People are different colors too. Our colors make us beautiful and unique. Mommy says it is part of our culture and the big word diversity — diversidad. Marvelous Maravilloso follows a young girl as she finds joy in the colors of the world all around her, including the colors of her own family. Includes a Note to Parents and Caregivers. Hear Marvelous Maravilloso read aloud.   Check out the companion book, The Heart of Mi Familia.   Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music by Michael Genhart, PhD When both grandpas, Abuelo and Opa, visit at the same time, they can’t understand each other’s language and there is a lot of silence. The grandson’s clever thinking helps find a way for everyone to share the day together as two cultures become one family. This unique book includes a bonus fold-out and a note from the author sharing the true story of his own family. Hear Accordionly read aloud.   Kids are observant and sensitive. Sharing books with them about these important issues

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Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with Books About Social Justice 2021-01-15T13:19:22-05:00

Finding Connection Through Music and Books

As the world faces the COVID-19 pandemic, many families find themselves being brought together or forced to be apart. Everywhere, people are looking for ways to stay positively connected. The little boy in Magination Press' book, Accordionly:Abuelo and Opa Make Music by Michael Genhart PhD, shows great creativity and wisdom as he finds a way to help his grandfathers connect through music. This post, from Dr. Genhart, explores the way picture books and music can help children and grown-ups connect with others. It’s a timely and timeless idea. Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music is the story of a boy who brings the two cultures of his family together through the music of the accordion – with the help of his two grandfathers, who do not speak each other’s languages but do speak the universal language of music. Based on my own family and memories from my childhood, this book is a joyful celebration of family and how common threads connect us all. More and more American families are multicultural, where different cultures come together to form a union of diverse languages, food, clothing, tradition, and ritual. Since children can sometimes feel like they are “not enough” of any one culture, it is important to offer them opportunities to celebrate the richness of all the cultures that make them unique. Children’s books are in a special position to affirm a child’s experience of being multicultural. The concept of “mirrors and windows” in children’s books highlights the many wonderful ways children can see the world, reflecting their own lives (mirrors) as well as introducing them to the lives of others that are not like themselves (windows). Similarly, the notion of “sliding doors” shows that stories for children can enable them to “walk into” other worlds. Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music is an example of how a children’s book can show all children that the world is a diverse place – some child readers will see themselves in this story while others will be invited to meet a family different from their own. Books where a child can identify with a main character in positive ways are tremendously powerful. They are doing some heavy lifting in that these books serve to bolster positive self-image and self-esteem. When kids see themselves in a book, in some cases for the first time, they can feel empowered, not alone, and not marginalized. In fact, children are likely to feel support, acceptance and love – important building blocks for positive development of self. Those children who are seeing a world unlike their own in books like Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music can confront any stereotypes or prejudices they may be holding, as well as begin to develop empathy and appreciation for diversity. Spoken language, particularly reading books aloud to children, is a powerful mode of communication. In Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music the accordion is a central character that shows that music is another potent means of communicating. In this story the

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Finding Connection Through Music and Books 2020-04-21T17:32:25-04:00