Stitch by Stitch

Piece by piece, stitch by stitch, that's how a quilt is made. From the blanket that his great-grandmother made for him as a boy, to the friends he gathered together in San Francisco as a young man, to the idea for a monument sewn of fabric and thread, Cleve Jones’ extraordinary life seems to have been stitched together bit by bit, piece by piece. Jones first had the vision for what became the AIDS Memorial Quilt during a candlelight memorial for Harvey Milk in 1985. Along with friends, Cleve created the first panels for the quilt in 1987. The AIDS Memorial Quilt grew to be one of the largest public arts projects ever and helped grow awareness of HIV and AIDS. The Quilt is an iconic symbol of hope and remembrance and is Jones’ shining achievement. Hear author, Rob Sanders, read Stitch by Stitch aloud.

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Stitch by Stitch 2022-02-08T13:37:23-05:00

World AIDS Day

December 1 is World AIDS Day. Established in 1988 by the United Nations’ World Health Organization, World AIDS Day is the first ever international day for global health. Every year, United Nations agencies, governments and civil society join together to campaign around specific themes related to HIV.  This year’s theme is End inequalities. End AIDS. End pandemics.  (https://www.unaids.org/en/World_AIDS_Day) In observance of World AIDS Day, we’re spotlighting books that focus on HIV/AIDS and LBGTQ+ history.  Stitch by Stitch: Cleve Jones and the AIDS Memorial Quilt by Rob Sanders From the blanket that his great-grandmother made for him as a boy, to the friends he gathered together in San Francisco as a young man, to the idea for a monument sewn of fabric and thread, Cleve Jones’ extraordinary life seems to have been stitched together bit by bit, piece by piece. This evocative biography is a touching tribute to Jones’ life of advocacy, the positive effects of a community working towards a common goal, and an inspiring story for young readers.  ★ “This neatly woven picture book biography features Cleve Jones (b. 1954), a white gay man who moved to San Francisco, became a mentee of Harvey Milk, and eventually came up with the idea for the AIDS Memorial Quilt.”  —Publishers Weekly, STARRED REVIEW Read an excerpt from Stitch by Stitch: Cleve Jones and the AIDS Memorial Quilt. Evelyn Hooker and the Fairy Project by Gail E. Pitman, PhD This evocative biography tells the story of Evelyn Hooker, the extraordinary woman behind the research, advocacy, and allyship that led to the removal of the “Homosexuality” diagnosis from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. A pioneering psychologist, Hooker was also a poet herself and a towering figure in LGBTQ+ rights.  “A true story of true allyship… this offers helpful materials for young researchers and audiences curious about LGBTQ+ history… Offers interesting information on a lesser-known hero.”  —Kirkus Reviews Read and excerpt from Eveyln Hooker and the Fairy Project. Sewing the Rainbow: The Story of Gilbert Baker and the Rainbow Flag by Gayle E. Pitman, PhD Follow the journey of a boy from a small Kansas town who made his gray life sparkle, unfurling a rainbow of color to galvanize the gay rights movement. “A colorful tribute to Gilbert Baker...creating the rainbow flag after a conversation with Harvey Milk. The art is beautiful and bright, transitioning powerfully from a subdued Kansan landscape to a flamboyant Bay Area...It's clear this book has a lot of love for the flag's promise.” —Kirkus Reviews When You Look Out the Window: How Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin Built a Community by Gayle E. Pitman, PhD When You Look Out the Window tells the story of Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, one of San Francisco's most well-known and politically active lesbian couples. Describing the view from Phyllis and Del's window, this book shows how one couple's activism transformed their community — and had ripple effects throughout the world. "Extensive information about Lyon and Martin's activism, marriage equality,

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World AIDS Day 2021-11-30T18:12:51-05:00

Celebrate Diversity with Books

October is Global Diversity Awareness Month.  Magination Press celebrates diversity in all its forms. It’s important for all children to see themselves reflected in books. Here are some of our recent publications that will engage young readers and can spark conversations about the world around them. Race and Ethnicity The Heart of Mi Familia by Carrie Lara, which was named a National Council on Social Studies/Children’s Book Council Notable book, follows a young girl as she works with her abuela and her grandma to create a wonderful birthday present for her brother. The gift celebrates her multicultural family and honors both sides and generations of her family. This follow-up to the award winning Marvelous Maravilliso: Me and My Beautiful Family is a must-read for all families. Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney, PhD, which one named one of Bank Street Colleges Best Children’s Books of the Year and a National Council on Social Studies/Children’s Book Council Notable book,explores the experience of a mixed-race child as she is repeatedly asked inconsiderate questions and how her brother helps her craft a powerful response.  Accordionly: Abuelo and Opa Make Music by Michael Genhart, PhD describes how a child brings his bicultural family together through music.  LBGTQ+ and Identity Papa, Daddy, & Riley by Seamus Kirst, which one named one of Bank Street Colleges Best Children’s Books of the Year and a National Council on Social Studies/Children’s Book Council Notable book, follows a little girl as explores what makes a family. After encountering questions about her family structure, Riley and her dads identify what every family is made of:  love. Jacob’s School Play: Starring He, She, and They by Sarah and Ian Hoffman chronicles how Jacob’s class finds itself unexpectedly struggling with identity, and what it means to be “he”, “she”, or “they” as they prepare for a school play.  Jacob’s School Play is an engaging way to introduce young readers to non-binary people and the pronoun options available to us all. Jacob’s School Play is a follow-up to Jacob’s Room to Choose, a book about gender expression. My Maddy by Gayle Pitman presents a child’s description of her gender-nonconforming parent. Publishers Weekly says the book “highlights the joy of in-between things—hazel eyes, sporks, sunrises, motorcycles ('It's not a car or a bicycle. It’s kind of both, and it’s something all its own') —gently illuminating the idea that people, too, can exist beyond categorization.”   Differently Abled Kids Brilliant Bea by Shaina Rudolph and Mary Vukadinovich explores the experience of a girl with dyslexia and how her teacher helps her find a way to showcase her strengths. Yes I Can!: A Girl and Her Wheelchair by Kendra J. Barrett, DPT, Jacqueline B. Toner, PhD, and Claire A. B. Freeland, PhD reflects the experience of a child who uses a wheelchair and how she can do almost everything the other kids can, even if sometimes she has to do it a little differently. Home and Family Issues Home by Tonya Lippert depicts the

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Celebrate Diversity with Books 2021-10-28T20:12:13-04:00