Child Development

Mom reading to her little girl

Week of the Young Child: Books to Share

Celebrate little kids! April 2-8 is the Week of the Young Child.  The Week of the Young Child®  was established in 1971 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. It recognizes that the early childhood years, from birth through age 8, lay the foundation for children's success in school and later life.  The purpose of the Week of the Young Child® is to focus public attention on the needs of young children, ages birth to 8,  and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meet those needs. 1  Magination Press has published a number of books specifically for young children. Here are some of our series that explore developmental stages, experiences, and emotions from the young child's world. Share them with your young child! Big Little Talks Series The Big Little Talks books are fun stories to ease both parents and children through typical and common life stages using empathic listening and encouraging an understanding of age-appropriate behavior and emotions. Feel Better Books Series This acclaimed series of books for kids ages 4-8 that explores young children's common feelings and experiences. Written in light, rhyming verse, The Feel Better Books identify emotions or challenging situations and provide kid-friendly coping strategies. Get Ready Board Books Series   This series of cleverly wordless board books with bright illustrations will delight little ones and their parents and provides an endless opportunity to engage toddlers in their own storytelling and interpretation of what they see in the book. Super cute and appealing, little kids will see themselves in the stories as the books capture a family's experience. Once Upon a Garden Series “The series is perfect for young children who are working with issues of shyness, self-acceptance, and courage, and discovering new talents, skills and hard work. There is simplicity in the text and the illustrations are happy and bright and compliment the emotions and themes in each book. This series is sure to boost the self-confidence of children.”  —Children’s Books Heal Terrific Toddlers Series Written with simple language and reflective of children's realities, the Terrific Toddlers series is based on understanding of the developmental level of young toddlers. Books for Nourishing Friendships Series “Children will relate to strong and memorable characters that jump off the pages, identify with their friendship problems and learn some new strategies for coping. The characters deal with their own issues and do their own problem solving in all three stories — no adults involved...This series will be a winning one with children.” —Children's Books Heal Check out other books feelings, family, and friendship to read with your young child.

Read More
Week of the Young Child: Books to Share 2022-04-06T17:05:12-04:00

Make the Most of the New Year

A new year provides the opportunity for setting new goals or aspirations. Magination Press has books for children and teens that can help with that process. Whether it’s setting goals, making friends, taking risks, or overcoming fears, these books can help your child make the most of the new year. Dream It! A Playbook to Spark Your Awesomeness by Scott Stoll and Sara E. Williams Dream It! is filled with open-ended brainstorming activities designed to help kids identify their goals and dreams. “Dream It! oozes empowerment with every page. Readers will leave this text feeling enabled and ready to communicate their goals with others.”  —Children’s Book and Media Review   The Not-So-Scary Dog by Alanna Propst Tommy’s fear of dogs is keeping him away from the birthday party of the year, so he and his mom hatch a step-by-step plan to overcome his fear in time for the party. This is a lighthearted, straightforward introduction to the concept of exposure therapy for kids dealing with phobias.  “Beneficial to families... A fear of dogs is no match for serviceable practicality.”  —Kirkus Reviews   Band Together by Chloe Douglass Duck loves peace and quiet! When a rowdy band asks him to join the show, he agrees, but gets nervous to perform with them. Why would they want him to play with them? A charming tale about being with friends and making new ones.   Fantastic You by Danielle Dufayet Fantastic You shows readers how to develop and nurture a loving and positive relationship with themselves. Kids will learn that self-care includes positive self-talk and self-compassion for a happy, self-empowered life. “We all need to take a page from Dufayet’s book: We can all forgive ourselves, and that’s a pretty important part of self-love. Dufayet’s book is a great reminder to adults and children alike that anyone can love themselves without the help of anyone else.”  —SDSU Children’s Literature   Check out more books about life skills and more books about self-esteem and confidence.

Read More
Make the Most of the New Year 2022-01-05T16:57:21-05:00

Support Your Boy’s Healthy Development

What exactly do boys do? The answer is ANYTHING and EVERYTHING! From eating to dreaming, making mistakes to exploring, to hurting and loving, there is more to being a boy than meets the eye. What Boys Do by Jon Lasser, PhD, is a fun, affirming book that holds no restraints to traditional norms about what it means to be a boy. Here’s an adapted excerpt from Dr. Lasser’s Reader’s Note with strategies to support boys. In the case of boys, we often think in terms of stereotypes of masculinity. In many Western cultures, boys are expected to be tough, stoic, self-confident, independent, aggressive, assertive, ambitious, and insensitive. This gender role may be transmitted to boys at a very young age. Many psychologists and educators are concerned that gender role stereotypes can be harmful to boys and men...Boys and girls may function best when they can integrate qualities that are masculine and feminine. When restricted to the qualities associated with one gender, children may be limited in their potential. Adults can facilitate the healthy development of boys by supporting their personhood rather than the more narrowly defined boyhood.  Ways We Can Help Boys Read diverse books to boys. Look for books that feature male and female characters with diverse interests. Boys may enjoy stories that show girls as strong heroes, or stories in which boys have opportunities to be creative and loving. Engage in imaginative play with boys. Playing house or school involves interpersonal communication, role-play, and imagination. Through play, you communicate that boys can take on nurturing roles.  Support boys’ goals and interests. All too often we assume that a boy wants to play a sport or play with toy trucks. Many boys do have such interests, and it's good to support them. Even so, some boys have an interest in dance or theater. Provide boys with a variety of options and support them in pursuing that which aligns with their interests.  Help boys see that there are many ways to be a boy/man. Though gender role stereotypes are powerful, there are countless examples in our communities of boys and men who have both masculine and feminine qualities. When you observe them, point them out to boys. Practice unconditional positive regard for boys. We have an opportunity to express love and acceptance of boys regardless of their gender expression. Though some may criticize boys who deviate from gender stereotypes, we can promote healthy development by accepting boys for being who they are.  Boys can experience a range of feelings and behaviors. We can help boys by showing them that there are many ways to be a boy, and support boys for being who they are.

Read More
Support Your Boy’s Healthy Development 2021-11-18T15:42:50-05:00